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What is an image file size?

Images are composed by several dots called pixels, and each of them has a color, represented as a combination of three basic colors (red, green and blue). To store each of these pixels, 3 bytes (24 ones or zeros) are generally used. When an image is large, it may have millions of pixels, and that means storing all information for an image like that in a computer or any device will take millions of bytes.

When a camera or cellphone says it takes 10 megapixels photos, it means that each photo has 10 million pixels (mega = million). And having 10 million pixels means it takes 30 million bytes (or 30 megabytes) to store that photo (which is a lot of space!). If you want to send this photo (or many photos) to a friend by e-mail, it will have to transfer 30 megabytes of data and it will take a while to upload it and a lot for the recipient to download it later.



How can I reduce my image's file size?

One way is compressing the image, which reduces file size without having to resize it. Image quality will suffer as you increase compression and start losing more data.

Another method is to resize your photo, decreasing the pixels it takes to store the image. Reducing image size doesn't reduce image quality, although it may lose small details.

Photos from modern cellphones and cameras usually have over 6 million pixels, while most cellphones, tablets, notebook or TV screens have only about 1.5 million pixels, which means you end up seeing a resized version of the image (you only use the full image if you print it). So if you resize your image, decreasing its width and height to a half, your image would have about the same number of pixels as the screens that will display it, and you wouldn't be losing any quality or detail, even looking at your image in full screen mode.

If you have a huge photo, we recommend resizing it to about 1900 by 1100 pixels, with JPG format and 90% quality. You will get a versatile image with great quality, that you can send to anyone without taking too much time.



Why is my photo so heavy?

When a photo is taken with a camera, the camera's sensor captures the light and color information and converts it into digital data. This data is then compressed and saved as a file, typically in the JPEG format. The file size of the photo is determined by the amount of data that is captured and saved in the image.

Resolution is one of the main factors that determine the file size of a photo. The higher the resolution, the more pixels are captured in the image, and the larger the file size. For example, a photo taken at 12 megapixels will have a larger file size than one taken at 8 megapixels.

Another factor that can affect the file size is the amount of detail captured in the photo. If the image has a lot of fine details, such as intricate textures or patterns, it will require more data to be saved, resulting in a larger file size.

Additionally, the number of colors used in the photo can also affect the file size. Images with a lot of colors, such as photographs of nature or landscapes, will require more data to be saved, resulting in a larger file size.

Lastly, if the photo was taken in a high-resolution mode or with a lot of editing applied, this can also increase the file size. These editing tools and special effects can add extra data to the image, making it larger.

In summary, the photo you took might be heavy in terms of file size because of the high resolution, the amount of detail captured, the number of colors used, and the amount of editing applied to the image.



Why should I use Reduce Images?

Our resizing tool is an excellent choice for users who need to adjust the size of their images without compromising on quality. Here are a few reasons why:

1 - It's free: Our resizing tool is completely free to use, which means users can resize their images without having to pay any additional costs.

2 - Easy to use: The tool is designed with a user-friendly interface that makes it easy to navigate and adjust the size of images. Users can simply select the image they want to resize, adjust the size, and save the changes in a matter of minutes.

3 - Completely offline: One of the major advantages of our tool is that it can be used completely offline. This means that the images never leave the user's computer, which is especially important for users who need to resize sensitive data like passports, driver licenses, or IDs.

4 - High-quality output: Our resizing tool uses advanced algorithms to resize images without compromising on quality. This means that the final image will retain its clarity, sharpness, and resolution, making it suitable for use in a variety of applications.

5 - Versatility: Our tool is versatile and can be used to resize images of any type, including JPEG, PNG, GIF, and BMP.



Can anyone see the photos I resize?

Our image resizing tool is a browser-based application that works entirely offline. This means that users can resize their images without having to connect to the internet or upload their images to a remote server. This feature makes it an ideal option for users who need to resize sensitive data like passports, driver licenses, or IDs.

The tool is based on a JavaScript resizing algorithm that allows it to work locally on the user's device. This means that the image is processed and resized within the browser, without the need to send the data to a remote server. This also means that users don't have to worry about the security of their data as it never leaves their device.

The algorithm uses advanced techniques to resize images without compromising on quality. It maintains the clarity, sharpness, and resolution of the original image, even after the size has been adjusted. This ensures that the final image is suitable for use in a variety of applications, including online forms, social media, and print materials.



What is included in the paid plans?

Our image resizing tool comes in both a free and a paid version. Both versions offer the same high-quality resizing capabilities, but the main benefits of the paid version is the ability to resize multiple images at once.

This feature allows users to process batches of large images in one go, saving time and effort. This is especially convenient for users who have a large number of images to resize, such as photographers, graphic designers, or businesses that need to process a lot of images on a regular basis.

All our paid plans offer the same capabilities, but for different time periods. One of the benefits of buying a longer period plan is that it offers a cheaper price per month. For example, buying a six months plan is 50% cheaper than buying a one-month plan six times in a row. This can be a cost-effective option for users who plan to use the tool regularly or for a longer period of time.

Additionally, buying a longer period plan also gives the user the flexibility to use the tool at their own pace, without having to worry about renewing their plan frequently.

If you are planning to use the tool in the long term and don't want to worry about renewing your plan every 6 months, you can choose a monthly subscription plan, which saves you 20% each month compared to the "Simple" 1-month plan.



Useful volcabulary and definitions for photo resizing

- Image resizing: The process of changing the dimensions of an image by adjusting the number of pixels in the image.

- Pixels: The tiny dots that make up an image. The more pixels an image has, the higher the resolution and the larger the file size.

- Resolution: The number of pixels in an image. A higher resolution image will have more pixels and therefore a larger file size.

- Compression: The process of reducing the file size of an image by removing unnecessary data. Different file formats, such as JPEG and PNG, use different types of compression to reduce the file size.

- File format: The type of file that an image is saved in. Different file formats, such as JPEG, PNG, and GIF, have different capabilities when it comes to image file size.

- Aspect ratio: The ratio of the width to the height of an image.

- Crop: The process of removing parts of an image in order to adjust its aspect ratio or focus on a specific area of the image.

- Scaling: The process of changing the size of an image by adjusting the number of pixels in the image.

- Interpolation: The process of adding pixels to an image in order to increase its size.

- Resampling: The process of adjusting the resolution of an image by removing or adding pixels.

- Lossless compression: A type of compression that reduces the file size of an image without losing any of the original image data.

- Lossy compression: A type of compression that reduces the file size of an image by discarding some of the original image data.

- DPI (Dots per Inch): A measure of the resolution of an image.

- Batch Processing: The process of processing multiple images at once.

- Algorithm: A set of instructions used to perform a specific task, in this case, image resizing.